Gehaltsvergleich von Managern Europa, Asien, USA,Middle East

Karriere, Gehalt, Positionen - wie geht es weiter?

Moderatoren: Haze, Katzenoma, Buffy

Benutzeravatar
Patrick333
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 476
Registriert: Do Mai 18, 2006 13:10
Tätigkeit: Ass. Quality Manager
Wohnort: Dubai
Alter: 37

Gehaltsvergleich von Managern Europa, Asien, USA,Middle East

Beitragvon Patrick333 » So Mai 13, 2007 13:15

Hallo, ich habe einen Interessanten Artikel online gefunden, der die Gehaelter einzelner Manager Positionen weltweit vergleicht.

Stand der Umfrage war das Jahr 2005, unterteilt in Middle East, Far East (Asia), Western Europe und USA und in 3 Hotelgroessen-Kategorien untergliedert.

Ich fand es sehr informativ und es sind nicht nur irgendwelche unbestaetigten Angaben von Dritten.

Hier der link: (sucht nach Salary Survey: Hong Kong, Dubai Lead; Europe Lags)

http://www.hotelsmag.com/archives/2005/05/news.asp#5

Ansonsten hier der Text (nur englische Version, sollte aber kein Problem darstellen)!

Salary Survey: Hong Kong, Dubai Lead; Europe Lags
TORONTO In examining this year’s annual salary survey of hotel employees worldwide by Renard International Hospitality Search Consultants, Toronto, some interesting trends have emerged. While salaries remained flat overall in most regions of the world for 2004, including North America and Europe, certain markets are seeing such strong increases that they are throwing the surveys out of balance. Such markets include Dubai, which continues to outperform, and Hong Kong, which is leading the way in China—the market driving all of Asia. “Hong Kong is seeing figures we haven’t seen in 20 years,” says Stephen Renard, president. “And the overflow of Chinese travelers all through Asia will certainly improve things in the next two years.”

Other markets seeing improving salaries include the UK, which continues to beat out its continental Europe counterparts that have yet to realize an economic upturn; the Caribbean and Mexico; and Canada, where employees are seeing higher salaries as a result of “a shortage of good people,” Renard says.

Speaking of shortages, formally educated sales and marketing executives continue to be in short supply worldwide, as do revenue managers. The reason, according to Renard, is that people with these skills sets are finding they are able to apply those skills to more financially lucrative fields outside the hotel business. “Their experience and training are transferable so they’re going into other forms of tourism and private industries. We’re losing a lot of young people to airlines, computers—where they can afford to pay them a higher salary,” he says.

Another trend Renard is seeing is that more and more people over 50 are being hired than ever before. He attributes this to the shortage of highly qualified individuals in the 40- to 50-age range. “Because the early 1990s were so rough on the hospitality industry, very little money was put into training younger hoteliers. So they either left the industry or never got into it because there was no money.” Today, he says, there is a rise in the number of “30-something up-and-comers” and new opportunities for those in their mid to late 50s. “The 50-plus person now is seen as more available, more serious and more committed—and they’re not likely to look for another job in two years,” Renard explains. “It used to be you might as well retire at 50. This is the biggest change in the last few years.”


Bild

Bild

Bild

Bild


Denke ihr werdet das auch interessant finden!

MfG


Kai
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 708
Registriert: Fr Dez 29, 2006 18:50
Tätigkeit: Hotelfachmann & derzeit Hotelkaufmann-Azubi
Wohnort: Frankfurt am Main
Alter: 30

Beitragvon Kai » So Mai 13, 2007 14:21

Finde das sogar sehr interessant! Wusste garnicht dass das nach Räumen geht, aber wenn man darüber nachdenkt, ist es ja sehr logisch ;)

Benutzeravatar
Patrick333
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 476
Registriert: Do Mai 18, 2006 13:10
Tätigkeit: Ass. Quality Manager
Wohnort: Dubai
Alter: 37

Beitragvon Patrick333 » So Mai 13, 2007 14:48

Habe noch einen weiteren Artikel gefunden (wieder in english)!

Habe die interessanten Daten fett markiert. Viel Spass beim lesen!

The Price of Quality
Salary levels are crucial to attracting and retaining top talent, but what is a fair wage? HVS Executive Search’s Chris Mumford has the answers.

The 2005 annual survey report on recruitment, retention and turnover conducted by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development found that 37% of employers cited the level of pay when asked to list the key reasons for employee turnover during the last year.

Furthermore, when asked what steps they were taking to address the issue of staff retention, 40% stated that they were increasing pay.

It is clear that pay is a key part of successful employee hiring and retention. However, paying employees fairly is a constant balancing act. Pay your high performers too little and you risk losing them. Pay them too much and you dent your profitability. But how do you know what to pay?

Typically, there are a number of options to help you determine an employee’s pay packet. A popular method in the hotel sector is to make use of the network of contacts that most executives develop and gain informal market intelligence by asking industry colleagues.

Likewise, recruiters are often able to give an approximate figure of what a position is worth in the marketplace. Alternatively, a hiring manager may rely on past experience, or simply offer a new recruit the package paid to the previous incumbent.

"It is clear that pay is a key part of successful employee hiring and retention."For senior-level executive recruitment, the majority of hotel companies make use of market data collected through specific market salary surveys. These surveys allow companies to benchmark salaries against criteria that are relevant to their industry, sector and geographic location. In this way, companies are able to make strategic decisions, such as where to position themselves in the marketplace, and remain competitive.

KEY FACTORS

But what factors determine pay levels? What criteria should companies bear in mind when benchmarking an employee’s salary against that of the competitor peer group?

Specifically, does the character of the hotel have any influence on the level of pay awarded to management? When conducting a local market salary survey, how important is it to consider factors such as room count and location when comparing like with like?

According to Alistair Chambers, director of compensation and benefits at Rezidor SAS Hospitality: ‘We look at a number of factors when calculating general manager packages. These include, in addition to the specifications of the particular hotel, career history, past performance, previous earning history, location and local market conditions.’

Traditionally, factors that come into consideration when determining hotel pay include:

Size of the hotel in terms of both revenue and room count
The management type (owner-operated franchise, independent management company)
Hotel class (budget, mid-rate, first class, luxury)
Location (city centre, beach, airport)
Hotel type (resort, convention, extended stay)

Hotels come in all shapes and sizes, with varying management responsibilities, financial priorities, employee numbers and facilities. Managing a 100-room hotel with one restaurant and two small meeting rooms in a city centre is certainly a different proposition to running a 600-room resort property with multiple F&B outlets and conference and banqueting facilities in a beach resort.

In reality, however, do these factors actually have an influence on hotel management pay levels? Is bigger better when it comes to hotel size and pay packet size, or can less be more? Is there a difference between salary levels at luxury hotels and first-class hotels, between city centre hotels and resorts, or between chain and independent hotels?

‘A hotel with a higher room count will typically mean higher turnover, higher cost base, a higher number of employees to manage, and a higher complexity of operation,’ explains Alistair Chambers.

‘This in turn requires a general manager with a more senior profile and a higher salary package than at a smaller hotel. Similarly, if the local market placed a higher premium on salaries at five-star hotels than at three star hotels, then we would follow.’

ESTABLISHING A BENCHMARK

HVS studied hotel management salary data collected through the HCE Hospitality Compensation Exchange®.

First, we looked at those with the most responsibility, the general managers. We then analysed general manager base salaries at hotels in Paris with fewer than 200 rooms against those at hotels with more than 200 rooms. The results indicate that, on average, general managers of hotels with more than 200 rooms earn a base salary of €149,504, 23% more than their counterparts at hotels with fewer than 200 rooms who earn €121,511.

The difference in earning potential however becomes much greater when we look at the data by hotel class and compare general manager salaries at first-class hotels against those in the luxury segment. General managers at luxury hotels have greater earning potential than their colleagues in the first-class sector. The average luxury hotel general manager in Paris makes €169,662, a difference of 65% over that of first-class hotel general managers who earn €102,722.

These figures make sense when considering the nature of a general manager’s job and their responsibility for the entire operation. Hotels with a larger room count and a higher classification are typically more complex to run and require a higher level of managerial responsibility.

But is it just the general manager whose salary is influenced by the type of hotel operation? Does the same hold true for other management positions in the hotel? Is a restaurant manager’s salary impacted by the size of the overall hotel? Is a sales manager selling room nights at a luxury hotel worth more than one selling nights at a first-class property?

Based on findings in a recent HVS survey of hotel salary levels in London, the answer is to all these questions is a resounding yes. Bigger hotels and luxury hotels pay more across the board, with few exceptions.

If one considers the 50th percentile, the point in the data range where 50% of the data falls, every position at luxury hotels in London has a higher salary than at first-class hotels, except for the executive housekeeper (whose salary differs by -2.76%). The average difference in average base salary between luxury and first class is 16%.

The same applies when one analyses the data by number of rooms; the bigger the hotel, the greater the average salary, except in the case of the sales manager. The difference, however, is not so great, with the average gap between salary levels being 7%.

This difference even applies at line level. HVS’s recent London salary survey included hotel restaurant waiters. The average base salary at first-class hotels was £11,660 against £12,995 at luxury hotels.

However, a salary package does not typically consist of just a base salary. When putting together an expatriate’s salary package in particular, there are a number of factors to bear in mind in addition to annual salary.

"Bigger hotels and luxury hotels pay more across the board, with few exceptions."Expatriate benefits vary depending on location, but in the main hotel senior management can expect an annual housing allowance, car allowance, health insurance, pension contribution, relocation expenses and annual flight tickets to the home country or country of hire. In addition, the executive often benefits from a tax-free salary paid in US dollars, euros or sterling.

For example, HVS recently undertook a study of salary packages awarded to hotel management in the Gulf region of the Middle East (see Table 1). The question was if, as with base salary, the various allowances were determined by factors such as hotel size and classification.

HVS took the general manager data and divided the peer group into two sets: those at hotels with fewer than 300 rooms and those at hotels with more than 300 rooms. The average annual housing allowance awarded to general managers of hotels with fewer than 300 rooms was $33,166. At hotels with more than 300 rooms, the average annual housing allowance was $34,147, a difference of 3%.

On examining the same general manager data by hotel class, the study revealed there to be only a very minor difference between the two groups. General managers at first-class hotels were awarded an annual housing allowance of $34,155 against $33,483 paid to general managers of luxury hotels, a 2% difference. The same also held true for annual travel allowance, car allowance, health cover and pension.

There is also little difference in bonus-earning potential. The average bonus for a general manager of an international chain hotel in the Gulf region is 33.6%. If the data is broken down by hotel size and class, there is a slight difference in bonus levels, but not in the way one might expect.

In fact, the bonus awarded as a percentage of salary was, surprisingly, higher at smaller hotels than at their larger counterparts, although the general managers at larger hotels had a slight edge in base salary.

Similarly, although general managers of luxury hotels earn considerably more in base salary than their colleagues at first-class hotels, when it comes to bonuses they actually earn less as a percentage of salary.

Therefore, it appears that, although base salary can be influenced by factors such as hotel size and class, additional salary package components such as housing and travel allowances remain constant, and bonus levels appear to be influenced by separate factors.

However, this does not negate the need to benchmark package components such as housing allowance against the competitor market norms. The hotel’s characteristics may not have an influence, but it is still important to ensure that each piece of the salary package is competitive within the market.

There are a number of factors to take into account when composing a competitive salary package that will boost employee attraction and retention. It is clear that of these factors, criteria relating to the character of the hotel have an influence on salary level.

It is therefore important to consider such factors when determining employee salaries and, through salary surveys, to benchmark salaries against relevant comparable data and compare apples with apples.


Stand September 2005

Kai
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 708
Registriert: Fr Dez 29, 2006 18:50
Tätigkeit: Hotelfachmann & derzeit Hotelkaufmann-Azubi
Wohnort: Frankfurt am Main
Alter: 30

Beitragvon Kai » So Mai 13, 2007 19:44

Superklasse, vielen Dank! Wenn ich mal Ruhe habe werde ich mir das alles genauer durchlesen, wer weiß, vllt ist es ja mal nützlich ;)


Benutzeravatar
Patrick333
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 476
Registriert: Do Mai 18, 2006 13:10
Tätigkeit: Ass. Quality Manager
Wohnort: Dubai
Alter: 37

Beitragvon Patrick333 » So Mai 13, 2007 20:05

Habe noch einen aelteren survey gefunden, da sieht man den Unterschied zwischen den einzelnen Kategorien und Groessen der Hotels sehr gut anhand der Zahlen. (Ist aber von 1998) jedoch wird dies heute nicht viel anders sein.

http://www.hotel-online.com/Trends/HVS/ ... tml#region

edit: (hab noch 2 weitere gefunden) aber das reicht jetzt, hab genug gesucht

http://www.hotelmotel.com/hotelmotel/ar ... p?id=28194

http://www.educationforadults.com/caree ... ality.html

p.s.: Das einzige was mich bestuerzt ist, dass die Gehaelter einfach mal unter aller Sau sind, fuer die Arbeit, die man in der Hotellerie hat ist das unterbezahlt, egal welche Position.

MfG
Zuletzt geändert von Patrick333 am So Mai 13, 2007 20:47, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.

Benutzeravatar
Patrick333
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 476
Registriert: Do Mai 18, 2006 13:10
Tätigkeit: Ass. Quality Manager
Wohnort: Dubai
Alter: 37

Beitragvon Patrick333 » Mi Mai 23, 2007 17:19

Also ich bin doch echt verwundert, dass es zu den Gehaeltern so wenig Kommentare gab!

Das ist doch normalerweise, was die meisten interessiert, aber keiner sich traut drueber zu reden, bzw. danach zu fragen!

Oder liegt es daran, dass es in englisch ist und es die Leute nicht verstehen?!? Selbst wenn, im ersten Beispiel sind es 4 Tabellen.

Hm, also ich wuerde doch gerne eure Meinung zu dem Thema hoeren und wissen, was ihr ueber solche niedrigen Gehaelter denkt!

MfG
Disclaimer: Alle meine posts enthalten meine eigene Meinung und representieren nicht zwingend die Standpunkte oder Meinungen von Hotel.

Benutzeravatar
bugi99
Küchenmeister
Küchenmeister
Beiträge: 427
Registriert: So Jan 15, 2006 17:28
Tätigkeit: staatl. geprf. Betriebswirt / Küchenmeister
Wohnort: Lübeck
Alter: 37

Beitragvon bugi99 » Mi Mai 23, 2007 18:30

... und wissen, was ihr ueber solche niedrigen Gehaelter denkt!
MfG
Ich hoffe du hast das "niedrig" ironisch gemeint!?
Wer sich nicht wehrt, endet am Herd!

Jeder hat das Recht nachzudenken, allerdings machen davon die wenigsten Gebrauch!

Benutzeravatar
Patrick333
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 476
Registriert: Do Mai 18, 2006 13:10
Tätigkeit: Ass. Quality Manager
Wohnort: Dubai
Alter: 37

Beitragvon Patrick333 » Mi Mai 23, 2007 20:18

Nein, ich habe das keineswegs ironisch gemeint!!!

Ich kann ja einige Beispiele auffuehren:

1) Western Europe - Front Office Manager (4 Sterne Hotel)

26.000 - 34.000 Euro Brutto Jahresgehalt, d.h. das waeren dann ca. 2.150 bis 2.800 Euro Brutto pro Monate, nach Steuern bleiben davon zwischen 1.500 - 2.000 Euro netto/Monat fuer F/O Manager!!!

Das finde ich niedrig, nein eigentlich eine Frechheit, Hungerlohn!!!



2) GM - Western Europe (4 Sterne)

67.000 - 110.000 Euro Brutto Jahresgehalt, d.h. 5.550 - 9.150 brutto pro Monat --> 3.850 - 6.400 Euro netto/ Monat!
Das ist zwar so gesehen viel Geld, jedoch fuer die Aufgaben und die Verantwortung die man als GM hat finde ich das nicht ausreichend!

Ihr duerft jetzt nicht vergleichen, was man als Kellner oder Rezeptionist verdient, sondern wirklich schauen, wie lange es dauert GM zu werden und was fuer ein Aufgabenfeld ein GM hat und selbst wenn man vergleicht, da verdient euer GM vielleicht "nur" 3-6 mal so viel wie ihr!


Erst wenn man das Beispiel des GM's in Paris (5 Sterne Luxushotel) nimmt (2. article) und die knapp 170.000 Euro Jahresgehalt betrachtet, kommt man an ein Niveau heran was einigermassen gerecht ist mit ca. 14.000 Euro brutto/Monat (weniger als 10.000 Euro netto/Monat).

Aber dann ueberlegt euch auch, dass solche Hotels in den teuersten Staedten der Welt vertreten sind und nicht in Hinterschiessmichtot-Hausen und somit die Lebenunterhaltskosten proportional groesser sind (Berlin, Muenchen, Hamburg, Paris, London, Dublin, Rom, Zuerich, Wien, usw.)!


Deswegen finde ich das die Gehaelter eine Frechheit sind und viel zu niedrig sind!


Ihr koennt doch nicht wirklich sagen, dass die Gehaelter angemessen sind, fuer das, was wir in der Hotellerie leisten muessen, mit Schichtdienst, Feiertagsdienst, unbezahlten Ueberstunden, usw....!!!
Disclaimer: Alle meine posts enthalten meine eigene Meinung und representieren nicht zwingend die Standpunkte oder Meinungen von Hotel.

Benutzeravatar
bugi99
Küchenmeister
Küchenmeister
Beiträge: 427
Registriert: So Jan 15, 2006 17:28
Tätigkeit: staatl. geprf. Betriebswirt / Küchenmeister
Wohnort: Lübeck
Alter: 37

Beitragvon bugi99 » Mi Mai 23, 2007 20:29

In der Gastronomie lkan man nicht so einfach reich werden, werf mal eien Blick in einen Tarifvertrag, da wirst du auch staunen.

Frag mal im Freundes- und Bekanntenkreis außerhalb der Gastronomie (nicht in der Schweiz) was die so bekommen. Das sind auch keine Unsummen, was denkst du denn, was man bekommen sollte???
Wer sich nicht wehrt, endet am Herd!

Jeder hat das Recht nachzudenken, allerdings machen davon die wenigsten Gebrauch!

Benutzeravatar
Patrick333
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 476
Registriert: Do Mai 18, 2006 13:10
Tätigkeit: Ass. Quality Manager
Wohnort: Dubai
Alter: 37

Beitragvon Patrick333 » Mi Mai 23, 2007 20:44

Mir ist die Tatsache bekannt, dass die Gastronomie schlecht bezahlt ist, aber genau das ist ja das Problem.

Wir leisten im Vergleich zu anderen Industriezweigen mehr, wenn nicht sogar sehr viel mehr, troztdem sind unsere Gehaelter schlechter und unangemessen.

Wieviel man meiner Meinung nach verdienen sollte?!?!

Ich wuerde sagen, dass man als F/O Manager min. die 3.000 Euro netto/Monat bekommen sollte

Fuer einen GM-Posten sollte man zwischen 7.500 - 10.000 Euro netto/Monat bekommen.

Man kann sich streiten, ob meine Vorstellungen zu hoch angesetzt sind, aber Hotels sind in der Lage einen hohen Umsatz und auch Profit zu erwirtschaften, um solche Gehaelter zahlen zu koennen, damit alle dabei genug verdienen wuerden.
Disclaimer: Alle meine posts enthalten meine eigene Meinung und representieren nicht zwingend die Standpunkte oder Meinungen von Hotel.

Benutzeravatar
BenTheMan
Ehren-Mod
Ehren-Mod
Beiträge: 1906
Registriert: Fr Nov 29, 2002 1:26
Tätigkeit: Night Manager/Night Concierge
Wohnort: Velden am Wörthersee
Alter: 38
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon BenTheMan » Sa Mai 26, 2007 17:45

Naja, solange die Zimmerpreise im internationalen Vergleich in Deutschland noch immer so niedrig bleiben, werde zumindest die deutschen Hotels nicht wirklich soviel zahlen können.
Ein Hotel ohne Concierge ist wie eine Kirche ohne Pfarrer

"Die Goldenen Schlüssel" -- "Union Internationale des clefs d'or"

Meine Bilder auf flickr.com

Bolle 911 919
Demi-Chef de rang
Demi-Chef de rang
Beiträge: 68
Registriert: Fr Jun 23, 2006 13:21
Tätigkeit: HOFA
Alter: 42

Beitragvon Bolle 911 919 » Mi Jun 06, 2007 13:48

@Patrick333,

ich bin auch der Meinung, dass ich leistungserecht bezahlt, glatt ... %
mehr Gehalt bekommen müßte. Wenn ich aber dann die mtl. GUV´s lese
und auswerte, weiß ich warum ich das Gehalt nicht bekommen kann.

Es gibt ein gutes Buch, was Du Dir mal bestellen könntest, es heisst :
" Hotellerie & Gastronomie "- Betriebsvergleiche 2006. Das Buch ist sehr
gut und man bekommt Éinsicht in Umsamtzzahlen und Kostenfaktoren.

Man muß beachten, dass die Hotellerie mit Ihren Umsätzen bis jetzt schon
Personalkosten zwischen 33- 37 % erreicht hat. Damit würden weitere Lohnerhöhungen den Gewinn des Unternehmens auffressen und nun stellt
sich die Frage an den Unternehmer bzw. Betreiber, ist das denn noch rentabel?!

Grüsse...Bolle

cyphlor
Demi-Chef de rang
Demi-Chef de rang
Beiträge: 75
Registriert: Di Aug 22, 2006 20:47
Tätigkeit: Night Audit Supervisor
Wohnort: Salzburg
Alter: 33
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon cyphlor » Do Jun 07, 2007 0:44

Hui, da bin ich ja richtig gut bedient. Auf dem Level eines FOM :D Zumindest vom Gehalt ;)

Aber jetzt überleg mal, du bist GM. Selbst mit 4500€ netto im Monat kann man doch eigentlich nicht klagen oder? Wenn ich dieses Gehalt mal bekomme, wäre ich zufrieden. Du arbeitest schliesslich mindestens bis 65, also kannst du dir damit eine schöne Existenz aufbauen. Zudem bekommen die höheren Posten zu Ihrem Gehalt noch immer einen Extra Bonus von ein paar tausend Euro pro Jahr. Also sooo schlecht geht es denen bestimmt nicht.

Benutzeravatar
Patrick333
Maitre
Maitre
Beiträge: 476
Registriert: Do Mai 18, 2006 13:10
Tätigkeit: Ass. Quality Manager
Wohnort: Dubai
Alter: 37

Beitragvon Patrick333 » Sa Apr 12, 2008 14:27

Ich hole den thread mal wieder hoch, da ich drauf gebracht wurde!

Also @ cyphlor

Klar kann man sich mit 4500 Euro eine Existens aufbauen, aber welches Risiko hat man als GM?! Du bist fuer alles vernatwortlich, wenn du das Budget nicht erreicht bist du der erste der geradestehen muss, nicht der Kellner oder die Hausdame!

Und schau dir die GM's von heute an! Wie lange wohnen die eigentlich noch an ein und dem selben Ort fuer laenger als 2-4 Jahre? In der internationalen Kettenhotellerie wird man geschickt, nach hier und da! Da ist nix mit Hausbauen und niederlassen, da ist man staendig auf Achse!

Dafuer sollte man kompensiert werden mit entsprechenden Gehaeltern!


Vielleicht haben ja einige was neues zu berichten, oder die Neuen unter uns was zu sagen!
Disclaimer: Alle meine posts enthalten meine eigene Meinung und representieren nicht zwingend die Standpunkte oder Meinungen von Hotel.

Benutzeravatar
ShocK
Moderator
Moderator
Beiträge: 970
Registriert: Sa Mai 13, 2006 11:38
Tätigkeit: Hotelfachmann
Wohnort: Hamburg
Alter: 33
Kontaktdaten:

Beitragvon ShocK » Sa Apr 12, 2008 21:46

Ich zitiere mal aus einer aktuelleren RollingPin, es ist ein Bericht über den Hotelstandort Singapur:

"Zumeist wird an sechs Tagen die Woche gearbeitet, in Managementpositionen werden die Stunden nicht mehr gezählt., das Arbeitspensum ist hoch.
Dafür verdient ein Abteilungleiter durchschnittlich 3.000 Euro netto monatlich, für einen General Manager sind es bis zu 14.000 Euro netto - und mehr, je nach Verhandlungsgeschick sind Unterkunft, privater Chauffeur und weitere Extras inbegriffen."
-------


Mein Statement: Glaube nicht, dass die GMs dort noch so unglaublich viel mehr arbeiten müssen als die GMs in Deutschlands Ketten?
- To achieve great things, you must first dream great dreams -



Zurück zu „nach der Gastronomie-Ausbildung“

Wer ist online?

Mitglieder in diesem Forum: Bing [Bot] und 4 Gäste